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Tekken Tag Tournament
 
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STORY: In terms of plot, Tekken Tag Tournament does not have a storyline and was developed as a "dream match" with characters from all previous installments of Tekken.
 
REVIEW
Tekken Tag Tournament reunited every character in the franchise to date, making up an extravagant roster of 39 characters. Most importantly, this installment of Tekken introduced intense 2-on-2 tag team battles and featured the fastest gameplay yet. With Tekken 3's gameplay engine as a starting point, Tekken Tag presented a finely tuned and more balanced 3D fighting game. The gameplay is more combo friendly than Tekken 3 and also introduced flashy tag-team combos & throws. The sidestep mechanics were also improved upon, allowing players to skillfully dodge their opponent's attacks left or right.
 

That grass looked pretty awesome on PS2.

 
Many animations were tweaked from Tekken 3 to Tekken Tag, offering a smoother visual (and gameplay) experience for players of all levels. On that note, Tekken Tag's gameplay is intuitive enough for beginner players to enjoy, but only lives up to it's true potential when two skilled players are in the ring. Returning fighters were updated generously with a handful of new moves, throws, and combo possibilities. Over-powered moves & characters from Tekken 3 were rightfully toned down as well. Rage Mode was also introduced in Tekken Tag, allowing teammates on the sidelines to become more powerful for a period of time after being tagged in. Since you lose a round even if one of your characters are KO'd, Tekken Tag offered incredibly strategic, unique and exciting battles that hardcore players enjoyed for years on end.
 

That's a 101 arm bar right there...

 
The arcade version of Tekken Tag didn't look much different from Tekken 3 and somewhat failed to impress visually. However, the graphics for the Playstation 2 version were completely re-done and were truly "next-gen" at the time. The texture quality, lighting effects, and character models were simply amazing for a console fighting game in the year 2000.

With a shiny new paint job, Tekken Tag Tournament was definitely one of the star launch titles for the PS2. Also remixed for the home version was the soundtrack, which flows eloquently with the frantic pace of the game. The presentation wasn't quite as extravagant as what we saw in the console version of Tekken 3, but as usual, the gameplay is the real star of the show.
 

It hurts so much to win sometimes... in a good way.

 
Tekken has changed quite a lot from the early days. Now with more authentic fighters and martial arts styles, a connoisseur of martial arts will surely appreciate the authentic and well-executed martial arts techniques featured in this game. The fighters of Tekken are no doubt the most authentic martial artists of any fighting game to date. Aside from the authenticity and fluidity of the animation, the characters of Tekken are still among the hardest-hitting around... so many moves in this game never fail to make you cringe your teeth with joy.  

What Tekken does right cosmetically, it also does technically... and it's easily one of the most responsive fighting games to date. Tekken's control system was originally designed to feel natural and it has only gotten better with age. After a player inputs a command on their controller, the technique is executed in the next frame. In "one frame" after the input on your controller, you see the results displayed on screen. This fact alone gives Tekken Tag an ultra-responsive feel, and puts many other 3D fighting games to shame. After the amazing Tekken 3, Tekken Tag Tournament gave many hardcore fighting game players a place to call "home". 
 

  
                  
 
                        

 

 

Page Updated: July 4th, 2015
Developer(s): Namco
Publisher(s): Namco
Designer(s): Masahiro Kimoto      (Director)
Katsuhiro Harada
     (Director)
Yuichi Yonemori
        (Director)
Yasuhiro Noguchi
     (Producer)
Platform(s): Arcade, PS2, PS3
Release Date(s): Summer 1999             (Arcade)
Mar. 30th, 2000
        ( PS2)
Oct. 25th, 2000
         ( PS2)
Nov. 24th, 2000
        ( PS2)
Nov. 22nd, 2011       ( PS3 - in Tekken Hybrid)
Nov. 25th, 2011
        ( PS3 - in Tekken Hybrid)
Dec. 1st, 2011
           ( PS3 - in Tekken Hybrid)
Characters Jin, Kazuya, Heihachi, Law, Hwoarang, Eddy, Jack-2, Lei, Jun, Xiaoyu, King, Nina, Michelle, Julia, Gun Jack, Bryan, Paul, Yoshimitsu, Lee, Armor King, Wang, Anna, Kuma, Panda, Bruce, Baek, Kunimitsu, P. Jack, Ganryu, Devil, Angel, Roger, Alex, Tiger, Ogre, True Ogre, Unknown, Mokujin, Tetsujin

Featured Video:

Related Games: Tekken Tag Tournament 2, Tekken 3, Tekken Advance, Tekken, Tekken 2, Tekken 4, Tekken 5, Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection, Tekken 5: Dark Resurrection Online, Tekken: Dark Resurrection, Tekken 6, Tekken 6: Bloodline Rebellion, Tekken 7, Tekken Hybrid, Tekken 3D: Prime Edition, Tekken Revolution
  

Gameplay Engine  10 / 10
Story / Theme  9.0 / 10
Overall Graphics  9.5 / 10
Animation  9.0 / 10
Music / Sound Effects  10 / 10
Innovation  9.5 / 10
Art Direction  8.0 / 10
Customization  8.5 / 10
Options / Extras  9.0 / 10
Intro / Presentation  9.5 / 10
Replayability / Fun  10 / 10
"Ouch" Factor  9.5 / 10
Characters  9.0 / 10
BOTTOM LINE

 9.5 / 10

 Review based on PS2 version

 

Final Words:

Tekken Tag Tournament was an extremely popular fighting game both in arcades and on Playstation 2 due to it's stellar, skill-demanding gameplay. The tag-team element worked exceptionally well with Tekken's 3D gameplay engine and presented a unique and satisfying experience to both hardcore and casual players alike.

The variety of teams players can use adds tons of replay value and allows for practically endless combo possibilities. If the awesome gameplay wasn't enough for you, the PS2 version was packed with a variety of modes, including 4-player Pair Play Mode and Tekken Bowl Mode, where players could take their favorite fighters and go bowling for Heihachi-shaped bowling pins! While the home version of TTT lacked an actual story and FMV endings, the real-time character endings were halfway entertaining at least... but unfortunately, there's no dialogue what-so-ever in any of them. :/

Tekken Tag was (and still is) a very fun game for serious and casual players alike, but the solid gameplay system really separated the newbs from the pros. Button mashers and beginners have absolutely no chance of winning against a seasoned player (unless they decided to go easy on them ). Hence, Tekken Tag was a very rewarding fighting game in its heyday.
~TFG Webmaster
 

 


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